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  • Erratum
  • Open Access

Erratum to: Planted forest development in Australia and New Zealand: comparative trends and future opportunities

New Zealand Journal of Forestry Science201545:2

https://doi.org/10.1186/s40490-014-0032-5

  • Received: 25 December 2014
  • Accepted: 25 December 2014
  • Published:

The original article was published in New Zealand Journal of Forestry Science 2014 44:S10

After publication of our work (Rhodes and Stephens 2014), we realised that incorrect data was included in Table five (Table 1 here). Specifically, most of the mean annual increment values and some of the rotation lengths were misquoted. The correct version of Table five (Table 1 here) is provided here.
Table 1

Australian regional growth rates for wood plantations

Species

Mean Annual Increment (m 3 ha -1 year -1 )

Rotation length (years)

Region(s)

Temperate eucalypts (pulpwood)

16 - 25

10 - 14

Tasmania, South Australia, New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland, south-west Western Australia

Temperate eucalypts (sawlog)

13 - 20

25 - 45

Tasmania, South Australia, New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland, south-west Western Australia

Araucaria spp.

13 - 15

50

Queensland, northern New South Wales

Pinus radiata

16 - 21

30

Tasmania, Victoria, New South Wales, south-west Western Australia, South Australia

Pinus elliotii and P. caribaea hybrids

12 - 18

30

Queensland, northern New South Wales

Eucalyptus nitens

15

15

Tasmania

Source: Gavran et al. (2012).

Notes

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
New Zealand Forest Owners Association, PO Box 10986, Wellington, 6143, New Zealand
(2)
Australian Forest Products Association, PO Box 239, Deakin West ACT, 2600, Australia

References

  1. Gavran, M, Frakes, I, Davey, S, & Mahendrarajah, S. (2012). Australia’s plantation log supply 2010-2054. Canberra: Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences.Google Scholar
  2. Rhodes, D, & Stephens, M. (2014). Planted forest development in Australia and New Zealand: comparative trends and future opportunities. New Zealand Journal of Forestry Science, 44(Suppl 1), S10. http://www.nzjforestryscience.com/content/44/S1/S10.View ArticleGoogle Scholar

Copyright

© Rhodes and Stephens; licensee Springer. 2015

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited.

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